Announcing The Paleo Approach Dinner Club E-Book!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I’ll receive a commission. I only affiliate myself with products I believe in and I think are worth the money, since I understand what it’s like to operate on a tight budget!

You guys!

I am thrilled to announce that I have been part of the creation of a collaborative, amazing new e-book, called The Paleo Approach Dinner Club! This genius idea came from Sarah Ballantyne (The Paleo Mom) herself, and she invited a bunch of bloggers (me included!) to contribute recipes.

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The e-book provides 12 complete dinner club meals plus two bonus meals – each with five original, delicious recipes created by amazing AIP bloggers just for this book! There are 82 recipes total! In addition to the recipes, the book contains helpful information for starting, organizing, and planning a “dinner club” with 8-10 people – it even has party game suggestions.

The idea is this: each dinner club meal has five recipes, including a main dish, three sides, and a dessert/drink. Each member of your dinner club will prepare one or two recipes or components of the chosen meal. This lets everyone share the load while ensuring a complete meal of healthy, delicious food.

Click here to view more details and to purchase the book!

This e-book is a great resource for the upcoming holidays. You can use it to introduce family and friends who might not follow the Paleo diet to the delicious, filling, and healthy foods you are able to eat while following the autoimmune protocol (AIP). It would also be a fantastic resource for setting up a social event with folks who do follow this lifestyle.

Often times being on a strict diet can feel lonely. This e-book helps fulfill an important part of being healthy – building community!

To get more information and purchase the e-book for $16.99, click here!

Golden Squash Drop Biscuits

biscuits

These beauties look, taste, and smell like buttermilk biscuits: gooey and moist on the inside with a little golden crisp on the outside. They’re a lovely, easy way to use up leftover roasted squash and only take a few minutes to whip up and bake.

The squash I used this time was a carnival squash (see photo below), which is orange inside and slightly sweet.

When I set out to make this recipe, I had no idea how different the texture of different squashes could be! Acorn, butternut, buttercup, festival, and delicata all produced slightly different results. After making these a million times with all kinds of squash to work out why sometimes the dough was too wet and other times was just right, I’ve changed the recommendation from using a food processor to mashing by hand, and provided additional ingredients to try if your dough turns out either too dry or too wet.

Good luck, and let me know what works for you!


Golden Squash Drop Biscuits

Servings: Makes 6-8 small biscuits.

Ingredients:

1 cup roasted squash, mashed
2 Tbsp tapioca starch
1/4  tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
Up to 2 TBSP coconut oil
Up to 4 TBSP coconut flour

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
2. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper.
3. Add squash, tapioca starch, baking soda, and salt to a bowl.
4. Mash together your ingredients until well mixed to form a sticky dough.
5. If the dough is too dry, add a small amount of melted coconut oil. If the dough is too wet, add up to 4 TBSP of coconut flour.
6. Form dough loosely into 1.5 to 2 inch diameter balls.
7. “Drop” onto parchment covered baking sheet.
8. Bake for 20 minutes, until the outside turns golden brown.
9. Let cool for 5 minutes before eating.

Tips:

– To roast squash, I cut it in half and place cut side up in a baking dish. I add a little coconut oil and roast at 400 for 30-45 minutes. The result is not overdone or over soft. That firmness helps keep the dough from getting too moist.

– If using leftover squash that is cold from the fridge, pop it in the microwave to warm it up. This makes incorporating the oil and starch much easier.

squash

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Zucchini Apple Hash with Chicken and Sage (AIP, Paleo)

Zucchini Apple Hash

Ingredients

serves 1-2

2 tbsp coconut oil
1 tbsp coconut flour
½ tsp sage
½ tsp salt
1 cup zucchini, shredded
½ cup apple, diced
1 cup onion, diced
1 cooked chicken breast, shredded

Directions

1. First, take care of shredding your zucchini and cooked chicken breast, and dicing up your apple and onion.

2. In a small bowl, mix together coconut flour and spices.

3. In a large bowl, toss together shredded zucchini and apple. Drain off any of the excess liquid from the zucchini (after sitting for a few minutes, I definitely had some liquid to drain).

4. Add coconut flour/spice mix to zucchini/apple mixture and toss to incorporate.

5. Heat coconut oil in frying pan over medium-low heat.

6. Add diced onion and cook until soft and carmelized (about 10-15 minutes).

7. Add zucchini/apple/spice mixture and cook uncovered for about 10 minutes, or until apples are soft.

8. Stir in chicken and cook for 2-3 more minutes, or until chicken is hot.

9. Enjoy the taste of fall.

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Two Reviews: The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook and 28 Days of AIP e-book

The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook by Mickey Trescott
This book has been around for a while, so I’m a little late to the party but hey! I’m happy to be showing up now. The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook is written by Mickey Trescott, who blogs at www.autoimmune-paleo.com. She was one of the first resources I found about AIP, and her incredible blog helped me so much in making the decision to try the AIP, so I was thrilled when she gave me a copy of the cookbook to review.

There is no doubt that this book is gorgeous to look at. The photography, layout, and font all bring to mind an idyllic, rustic scene of natural goodness. Each page is simple, uncluttered, and clear. The recipes are straightforward, without unnecessary wording crowding up the page. But the book goes far beyond being pretty: it is a fabulous resource for anyone following an allergen-free diet, at any stage of their journey. For those new to following the AIP, the book opens with the mainstays of the autoimmune protocol diet, including a brief explanation of the AIP, lists of foods to include and exclude, and the food reintroduction process. There are even two, four-week meal plans with shopping lists to help you get started.

For those who have been following the AIP for a while, and feeling bored or stuck in a rut (like me, lately), this book provides a way out through delicious, colorful, nutrient-dense recipes guaranteed to inspire. The book covers basics like bone broth and kombucha, twists on old favorites that are easily missed on the AIP  (like Mayo and Cherry BBQ Sauce, which was a huge hit with my family), and creative ways to keep entree dishes exciting (I made the Garlic Beef and Broccoli this weekend- yum!). There are meals to impress dinner guests (Herb-Stuffed Trout, anyone?) and staples to get you through the week (like Tuna Salad and a variety of ground meat patties). No matter what stage of the AIP process you are in, The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook will meet you where you are and make your journey more creative, more tasty, and more nutrient-dense. You can order the cookbook at http://www.amazon.com/The-Autoimmune-Paleo-Cookbook-Allergen-Free/dp/0578135213. 28 Days of AIP 28 Days of AIP by Christina Feindel
Anyone who follows a lifestyle like the autoimmune protocol knows that food can keep you constantly preoccupied with meal planning, grocery shopping, recipe hunting, and food prep. Christina Feindel of www.ACleanPlate.com has harnessed her no-nonsense approach to a healing diet by creating a great resource to help you get out of the kitchen and back to doing what you love. She gave me her new e-book, 28 Days of AIP, to review. The book provides four weeks of meal plans, grocery lists, and links to her recipes at www.acleanplate.com.

At the beginning of the book are some helpful suggestions for adapting the meal plans according to your needs.  The e-book incorporates old favorite recipes from the archives at A Clean Plate (many of which I’ve tried before and loved) and also introduces 8 brand new recipes to add to your repertoire. One of the things I struggle with is getting enough variety into my diet. I find what’s easy and stick to it, sometimes slacking off on focusing on varying my food and nutrients. These meal plans ensure that you’ll get a variety of nutrient-dense foods recommended in The Paleo Approach, including plenty of veggies and organ meats (I am planning to try the liverwurst recipe when I can get my hands on some good grass-fed liver). For anyone feeling overwhelmed by following the AIP or looking for great suggestions for changing up a repetitive routine, 28 Days of AIP is the way to go! Download the e-book at http://www.acleanplate.com/28-days-of-aip/.

Pesto Pasta Salad (AIP)

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Big news, folks! As of last week, my blog has been awarded “The Paleo Approach Approved” badge (see sidebar)! The badge indicates that this blog is a resource which aligns with the recommendations in Sarah Ballantyne’s book, The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body. I feel so honored to be a part of the growing Paleo Approach community with a number of other talented bloggers. To view all the TPA Approved resources and blogs (all of which I highly recommend!), visit http://www.thepaleomom.com/tpa-approved

On to the latest recipe! Now that the farmers market is just bursting with fresh produce, I found myself overwhelmed with the amount of zucchini in my fridge. Zoodles  (“zucchini” + “noodles”. Get it?) are a fabulous way to eat it up!

Pesto Pasta Salad
Serves 4

Ingredients

For Pesto:

1 bunch basil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/3 cup olive oil
½ tsp salt

For “Pasta” and Veggies:

3 zucchini
1 carton mushrooms (8 oz), sliced
2 baked chicken breasts, shredded
2 Tbsp coconut oil

Directions

First, make your zoodles. If you have fancy tools for doing this, like a spiralizer, great! Use those. If you do not have fancy tools (like me) just use a potato/vegetable peeler. Peel off the skin and discard, then just keep right on peeling the flesh into long strips, straight into a colander. This makes fettuccini-like noodles. Peel until you get to the seeded, inner part of the zucchini. Set seeded part aside. Sprinkle zoodles with salt and set colander in the sink for 20 minutes.

Make pesto. Remove basil leaves from stem. Add basil, garlic, olive oil, and salt to food processor. Process until well-chopped and mixed.

Slice up remainder of zucchini. Heat coconut oil in a deep frying pan over medium heat. Add mushrooms and zucchini. Cook for 10-15 minutes until cooked to your liking. I like mine to start getting a little brown and crispy.

While shrooms and zukes are cooking, squeeze excess moisture from the zoodles (the salt helps draw it out). Once the mushrooms and zucchini are cooked to your liking, add zoodles and cooked chicken to pan and cook for 3-5 more minutes until zoodles are slightly cooked and chicken is warm.

Remove from heat and stir in the pesto. Enjoy hot or cold!

Field Notes on A Typical Week

The title of this post is a little misleading, because in my experience, a healing diet and lifestyle doesn’t usually follow a “typical” course. Each new week comes with its new hurdles, new food reactions, new questions, and new triumphs. But after doing this for a while, I’ve fallen into a pattern of food prep that makes being on a healing diet simpler.

Lately, I’ve figured out a good routine that involves making two dishes on the weekend, which will serve as my breakfasts and lunches for the entire week. Yes. I eat the same thing every day for five days in a row. As someone who cooks for myself and works a full time job, that’s what works for me. Each evening meal is usually baked fish with a roasted vegetable. 

Hash with words

I make this all the time for breakfasts and lunches. Two pounds of grass-fed ground beef plus what ever kind of spices and vegetables I feel like adding. I use this to get my sulfurous veggies in – broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels Sprouts are the usual suspects. I add garlic, ginger, and turmeric. This is where I might hide some liver to get my dose of organ meats.

Soup

Chicken soup has become a regular feature this winter. I make it with homemade bone broth and add whatever veggies and herbs sound good. I will eat this for any meal. Always with a side of greens!

Salad

I have gotten to the point where I can digest raw vegetables again. Lately my go-to lunch is a cabbage-based salad with broccoli slaw, green onion, cilantro, and a generous pour each of olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and coconut aminos. So simple, and so good. I wash and mix up the vegetables and herbs at the beginning of the week and add my protein and dressing in the morning before work.

 

Cakes

Blurry picture of nori, roasted carrot fries and fennel, spinach, and my salmon cakes.

fish

Tilapia with a drizzle of olive oil and roasted cabbage.

Finding into this routine took me months of practice.  It took a while to figure out how much food I really needed each week and when I should do my cooking.  I also eat a piece of fruit every day, usually an orange with lunch. I am newly working on incorporating more starch – like yucca, taro root, and plantain – into my diet since I’ve started working out again (yay!).

What does your typical week on a healing diet look like?

AIP Yam and Liver Meatballs

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Liver. **Cue groans of dread**

I’m not a big fan of liver. It’s messy to prepare and I usually am not happy with the taste/texture that results. So why bother? The Autoimmune Protocol emphasizes eating for nutrient-density, and organ meats are some of the most nutrient dense foods around. So even though they might be a pain to prepare (in my experience), I try to incorporate them into my diet often.

I like the Paleo Mom’s idea of hiding liver in recipes to mask the flavor and texture, like her Hidden Liver Meatloaf. However, I found the recipe that didn’t hide the flavor quite enough for me. The way I was able to eat it all was by combining every single bite of meatloaf with a bite of sweet potato.

So I  incorporated sweet potato in these meatballs for further masking. I also used a smaller ratio of liver to meat – opting for a 1/2 pound slice instead of the full pound. It worked! The sweet potato and coconut aminos make these meatballs sweetly delicious, and the liver taste is barely detectable.

Yam and Liver Meatballs

2 lb ground beef
1/2  lb liver
2 medium yams, pre-baked and pureed
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp onion powder
1 tsp salt
3 Tbsp coconut aminos

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cover two cookie sheets or cake pans with foil. Since my kitchen is small and slightly under-stocked, I used one foil covered cake pan and one glass baking dish. Both worked!

The worst part is the first part: puree your liver in a food processor until smooth.

Add liver and rest of ingredients to a bowl and mix together. Use your hands and dig in!

Roll into meatballs and place on your pans.

Cook for around 30 minutes, or until meatballs are done in the middle.

Enjoy with some extra coconut aminos for dipping sauce.