Easy Fermenting: Beet Kvass

Getting into fermenting foods can be intimidating. I’d read about how important it was to regularly consume fermented foods as a way to improve the flora in your gut. I thought about it and waffled on it for months before finally taking the Big Leap. Only to find that the Leap wasn’t that big at all – fermenting stuff is easy! It’s fun! And it’s tasty!

My favorite ferment so far is beet kvass. It takes minimal preparation, a week or so on the shelf, and the result is an earthy, salty, slightly sweet fizzy drink that’s great with a squeeze of lime. If you’re waffling on taking the Leap, try kvass as a first step.

Beets

Beet Kvass

2-3 Beets
1 Tbsp Sea Salt
Filtered Water

Instructions:

Scrub (but don’t peel) beets and chop into inch-sized cubes.

Drop into a jar. I use an empty Bubbies jar, which is about 25 fl. oz. If you use a bigger jar, add a second Tbsp of sea salt.

Add sea salt and filtered water over the beets. Leave about an inch of space at the top of the jar and seal it tightly.

Put it on a shelf in a warm room and forget about it for a week. After a week, it should be ready to be put in the fridge and enjoyed.

*Economical Tip: Re-use the same beets for another batch!*

 

Field Notes on A Typical Week

The title of this post is a little misleading, because in my experience, a healing diet and lifestyle doesn’t usually follow a “typical” course. Each new week comes with its new hurdles, new food reactions, new questions, and new triumphs. But after doing this for a while, I’ve fallen into a pattern of food prep that makes being on a healing diet simpler.

Lately, I’ve figured out a good routine that involves making two dishes on the weekend, which will serve as my breakfasts and lunches for the entire week. Yes. I eat the same thing every day for five days in a row. As someone who cooks for myself and works a full time job, that’s what works for me. Each evening meal is usually baked fish with a roasted vegetable. 

Hash with words

I make this all the time for breakfasts and lunches. Two pounds of grass-fed ground beef plus what ever kind of spices and vegetables I feel like adding. I use this to get my sulfurous veggies in – broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels Sprouts are the usual suspects. I add garlic, ginger, and turmeric. This is where I might hide some liver to get my dose of organ meats.

Soup

Chicken soup has become a regular feature this winter. I make it with homemade bone broth and add whatever veggies and herbs sound good. I will eat this for any meal. Always with a side of greens!

Salad

I have gotten to the point where I can digest raw vegetables again. Lately my go-to lunch is a cabbage-based salad with broccoli slaw, green onion, cilantro, and a generous pour each of olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and coconut aminos. So simple, and so good. I wash and mix up the vegetables and herbs at the beginning of the week and add my protein and dressing in the morning before work.

 

Cakes

Blurry picture of nori, roasted carrot fries and fennel, spinach, and my salmon cakes.

fish

Tilapia with a drizzle of olive oil and roasted cabbage.

Finding into this routine took me months of practice.  It took a while to figure out how much food I really needed each week and when I should do my cooking.  I also eat a piece of fruit every day, usually an orange with lunch. I am newly working on incorporating more starch – like yucca, taro root, and plantain – into my diet since I’ve started working out again (yay!).

What does your typical week on a healing diet look like?